Archive for October 1st, 2007

Lufthansa And Swiss Cooperate With myclimate.org

myclimate logo

myclimate, is a Swiss non-profit foundation well known as a leading provider of carbon offsetting measures combating climate change. Since 2002 climate conscious consumers have the possibility to make compensation payments to myclimate for man-made CO2 emissions and in this process are supported by an emissions calculator. Any volunteer contributions made are used to fund myclimate protection projects. These projects comply with the highest quality standards and contribute to the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions.

Lufthansa Logo  Swiss logo

At about the same time as the Qantas group announced their similar, separate green program, only two weeks ago myclimate launched a new initiative together with Star Alliance members Lufthansa and Swiss International Airlines. The airlines now offer their passengers the option to use myclimate’s offset solutions by adding the voluntary option to their website. There are dedicated websites set up for Lufthansa (http://lufthansa.myclimate.org/EN) and Swiss (http://swiss.myclimate.org/EN) enabling passengers to make donations for environmental protection after calculating their share of pollution based on their departure, transfer and destination airports. The branded websites include a slightly modified calculator that actually takes into account the fuel efficiency of the fleet of each airlines. I have made a trial, if I use the standard myclimate.org website’s calculator, for a return flight between Budapest and Frankfurt on economy class (business and first produce more emission according to the calculator…) I end up with 0.376 t of CO2 emission, while if I use the Lufthansa branded website (as Lufthansa has a more fuel efficient fleet than the industry standard), for the same return flight and same distance flown (1668 km) the result of the calculation equals only 0.278 t of CO2, which means a difference of -27%. If I would change planes in Zürich (and fly with Swiss, using the Swiss branded calculator) it would of course be a longer distance of 2183 km, with 0.482 t of CO2 emitted, which means 73% more emission than if I would have flown directly. Actually both branded websites show the same results for the same querries, with the same lower than average amount of emission levels.

Both airlines have chosen dedicated projects which they support from the money their passengers will pay to offset their emissions from their flights. Lufthansa and Swiss support two projects in Karnataka and Bihar in India, where emissions are reduced through the production of electricity from agricultural waste instead of coal and diesel.

René Estermann, managing director of myclimate has said: “The commitment of these two airlines will hopefully soon contribute to a significant increase in the number of air passengers who volunteer to offset their CO2 emissions. It is another small step in the right direction, namely to give CO2 emissions a value.” The above mentioned return flight which I used as an example for the trial (BUD-FRA-BUD) would suggest that I volunteer EUR 3 per flight for offsetting my share of pollution, which would be a total of EUR 6. Just flying between Zürich and New York (and back) for example would generate 1.238 t of CO2 and would require the passenger to pay a compensation of EUR 25.

Just an interesting calculation: if a business man flies to Frankfurt from Budapest twice a month (except for the Christmas period and summer holidays), the generated annual CO2 emission would be 0.278 t * 22 = 6.116 t (! equaling the weight of about 5 average size car from the Volkswagen Golf category!), and this amount of CO2 could be offset by paying a fee of EUR 132. I wonder if there are any companies that are environmentally committed so much that they are willing to pay for the offsetting of all (or at least part of) the CO2 emissions of their employees that is generated while sending them back and forth around the globe countless times every year?

by balint01

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Air New Zealand, Boeing and Rolls Royce Joint Development – Biofuel

Earlier we started a block about enviroment friendly initiations of airlines. We promised there to publish everything we find about this topic to support developments this way.

The following press release came from Air New Zealand. This is the complete article:

The airline will sign a memorandum of understanding today with aircraft manufacturer Boeing and engine maker Rolls-Royce to work together on projects aimed at ensuring that commercial aviation continues to become more environmentally sustainable.

The inaugural step in the relationship will be the first commercial trial of a bio fuelled, Rolls-Royce powered, Boeing aircraft toward the second half of next year/early 2009. The Boeing 747 flight, which is likely to depart Auckland and will not carry customers, will be conducted under strict safety standards.

Only one engine will run on a blended bio fuel/kerosene mix and the remaining three will be powered by regular aviation fuel. An announcement on the source and mix of the blended fuel will be made closer to the time of the flight.

Air New Zealand Chief Executive Officer Rob Fyfe says the test flight is another step in Air New Zealand’s plan to lead the global aviation industry in developing the most environmentally responsible airline practices possible and the most environmentally responsible airline.

Mr Fyfe says that as little as a year ago bio fuel seemed like “pie in the sky” to many aviation industry observers, but it is now a possibility and technology is moving so fast that it may become viable in a much shorter timeframe than previously thought.

“Air New Zealand is keen to encourage research into alternative fuels and wants to work hand-in-hand with industry partners and the New Zealand Government on promoting this type of activity. Today is a day that both the airline and country should be proud of. We are taking the first steps on what promises to be an inspiring and defining journey.”

Mr Fyfe says Air New Zealand would like to progress to an all New Zealand bio fuel for future tests flights, but sourcing the quantity necessary may be a challenge in the short term.

Air New Zealand has already made significant steps towards becoming one of the world’s most environmentally responsible airlines through a large fleet investment programme.

The Boeing 787 Dreamliner, due to come into Air New Zealand service in 2010, will save 20 per cent more fuel than similar aircraft through a combination of new technology and weight reduction.

“Along with the efficient Boeing 777s currently being flown by the airline, this will ensure Air New Zealand has one of the youngest, most technologically advanced, fuel efficient and environmentally friendly long haul fleets in the world,” Mr Fyfe says.

“Our long haul fleet purchases together with initiatives underway in the area of fuel saving, weight reduction and flying techniques put Air New Zealand at the forefront of environmentally responsibilities.”

By Szafi

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