Archive for the 'Singapore Airlines' Category

1,000 Airbus A380 Flights at Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines has announced yesterday that it has completed its 1,000th Airbus A380 commercial flight on Monday, when its scheduled service from Singapore to London Heathrow touched down in the United Kingdom as flight SQ 322. Singapore already operates five of the superjumbos, and claims that all aircraft have performed “remarkably” since entering service last October. In reality there were a few incidents indeed, but nothing major – and these kind of small glitches are normal in airline operations, especially when rolling out a new type into everyday operations.

Singapore Airlines A380 arriving at London Heathrow - c by Allan Huse on airliners.net

Singapore Airlines A380 arriving at London Heathrow - c by Allan Huse on airliners.net

The five airplanes have accumulated 8,500 flight hr. and carried nearly 400,000 customers. More than 220,000 have traveled on the Singapore-Sydney route, with the rest shared between Singapore-London and Singapore-Tokyo. This is really good news after the scandalous road of the Airbus A380 entry into commercial services. The sixth A380 is scheduled to arrive in September, with a further 13 to follow in the coming years. Singapore Airlines has options on an additional six and has been the first and only operator of the type until last week, when Emirates took their first Airbus A380.

by balint01

Singapore Airlines A380 News

Singapore Airlines took delivery of the third Airbus A380 superjumbo, which arrived in Singapore on Wednesday and has 471 seats, in the same configuration as the first two aircraft. The delivery was relatively quiet, even in dedicated news about airlines, it was only a two line short notification, rather than a regular news item. Singapore plans to use this aircraft on its new route to London Heathrow, together with their second one. The new route scheduled to open in a few days on 18MAR2008 will mark the first time an A380 is flying to the old continent as a scheduled service.

Second Airbus A380 delivered to Singapore Airlines (photo by Singarpore Airlines)

Separately Singapore Airlines has announced yesterday that it will open another new route flown by the largest commercial jet, on 20MAY2008, which will take the superjumbo to Japan. The new flight SQ636 will depart Singapore Changi at 23:40 (the inagural flight will take off one hour later) and will arrive to Tokyo Narita at 7:30 am (8:30) the next day. The return flight will take off from the Japanese metropolitan at 11:30 and will arrive to Singapore at 17:35 the same day. Tokyo is the fourth city to be serviced by the A380, and the first one in Asia. Tickets already bought for these flights remain valid without a change, similar to the way the London tickets were rebooked to the A380 automatically.

by balint01

New A380 Route to London

As we reported earlier, Singapore Airlines has already received their second Airbus A380 super-jumbo, and is planning to take the third one by mid March. While the second one currently serves training purposes and completes a few scheduled flights to Hong Kong, in reality she is only waiting for her sister to arrive so they can start to serve the first European route of the A380: London Heathrow directly from Singapore Changi airport.

The first flight with flight number SQ 308 will take off from Singapore at 9:00 am on 18MAR2008 and will arrive in London at 15:05 the same day. Then late afternoon at 18:55 it will head back to the home of Singapore Airlines (SIA) as flight SQ 319 and will arrive to its Asian destination at 15:35 on 19MAR2008. These two flights mark the official launch of the second route served by SIA after Sydney since October 2007 with the first super-jumbo. This will also be the first commercial flight of the A380 involving a European airport.

Following the special first day flights, the schedule will be similar to other flights on similar routes, please see the table below as provided by Singapore Airlines. The first one is about the interim time between 18MAR and 30MAR (the last day of the Winter schedule for the airline industry) the second table shows the schedule for the Summer season.

Scheduled A380 services (Northern Winter 2007/2008)
 
Flight number Commencement date Departure Time Arrival Time
SQ 322 Singapore-London Daily from
18 March 2008
2320 hours 0525 hours
next day
SQ 317 London-Singapore Daily from
19 March 2008
1100 hours 0740 hours
next day

Scheduled A380 services (Northern Summer 2008)
 
Flight number Commencement date Departure Time Arrival Time
SQ 322 Singapore-London Daily from
30 March 2008
2330 hours 0555 hours
next day
SQ 317 London-Singapore Daily from
30 March 2008
1155 hours 0745 hours
next day

According to the airline, those passengers who already have tickets for these flighs, will be able to fly on those flights, even though they originally purchased their flights not knowing that it would be served by the A380. Those, who already have a booking but not yet received a ticket for it, “may need to check if there have been changes to their fares as a result of the aircraft change.” In other words, their fares have probably been increased at least due to higher demand on these flights. If you manage to get on board the inaugural London flights (SQ308/319) on 18 March, you will receive personalised certificates recognising your participation in the milestone event, as well as limited edition Singapore Airlines A380 souvenirs and exclusive premium giveaways.

The introduction of this route flown by the A380 also marks the first case when a passenger will be able to connect from a flight on the A380 to another flight, also flown by the A380 if they travel between London and Sydney with a transfer in Singapore. In this case they will actually have to spend almost 13 hours in Singapore, but it may very well be worth it!

by balint01

Singapore Airlines Takes Delivery of Second Airbus A380

Second Airbus A380 delivered to Singapore Airlines (photo by Singarpore Airlines) 

On 11JAN2008, Singapore Airlines took delivery of its second Airbus A380 super-jumbo. The first one was delivered in front of the press, as it was the first ever A380 to be handed over for regular operations. The second one didn’t get as much attention and such a big ceremony, either, it was delivered and entered service relatively “quiet”, which marks the real entrance into everyday operations of the A380 in my opinion. From now on it is not “the A380”, but it’s one of the airplane types being operated around the world, and most probably – unless there is a problem while engine testing (which we hope will never happen again) – we will start not hearing about A380 deliveries, except for the firsts at each new airline that puts the model into service.

The first aircraft still flies daily between Singapore Changi airport and Sydney. The delivery of the second will allow Singapore Airlines to complement the first aircraft, allowing some rotation of aircraft on the existing Sydney route, and providing opportunities for crew training. The onboard set-up is exactly the same as on the first one (registration number: 9V-SKA) with 471 seats in three classes.

Then, on delivery of the third aircraft in late February, Singapore Airlines will start a daily service between Singapore and London Heathrow.

Singapore Airlines is the first to fly the A380, and is currently still the only airline in the world operating the aircraft. They have firm orders for a further 17 A380s.

by balint01

First A380 incidents

Although only two A380s have been delivered so far, one of them a few months ago, the second one on the 11th of January (last Friday), this weekend the first incident happened to the first one, although last year another one happened before its first delivery.

The first incident

An Airbus A380, the world’s largest passenger jet, scraped the tip of a wing on a building at Bangkok’s international airport in last September as it was preparing for a demonstration flight, officials of the aircraft company and Thai Airways said.

The plane, which had been taxiing with journalists and VIP guests on board, suffered minor damage, delaying its planned flight to the northern Thai city of Chiang Mai by just over three hours, they said. There were no injuries.

The second incident

A380 with winglet

The first A380, which has been operating between Singapore Changi and Sydney since October, rolled off the Singapore’s tarmac at the new Terminal 3 and onto the grass after the truck that was pushing it failed and disconnected from the plane, according to widespread press reports from Singapore. There were 446 passengers onboard and all disembarked safely. Arrangements reportedly were made to transport them to Australia aboard alternate equipment.

“As a consequence of the failure on the truck, the aircraft. . .came into contact with the grass verge off the airport tarmac. The aircraft was not under its own power at the time,” an Singapore Airlines spokesperson told CNN Friday. “It is too early at this time to know the cause of the incident, but Singapore Airlines will investigate this quickly and is filing reports with the appropriate Singapore authorities.” Four tires reportedly rolled up onto the grass and were replaced and the aircraft was scheduled to be ready to fly later Friday, Agence France Press reported, citing an Singapore Airlines spokesperson.

“The damage is very limited. It’s superficial in the sense that there is possibly damage to tires, but nothing to the structure of the aircraft,” SIA told the Associated Press. “The engineers are doing a very careful inspection of the plane. They’re being very careful because it’s the first time and they just want to be very sure.”

Source: AP, ATW Online

By Szafi

Best Of AirlineWorld 2007

This is the last day of the year. As billions of people around the world, we also took a look back to what happened in the old year and made some New Year’s Resolutions.

For us 2007 was not a full year as we started our blog in June. It was a nice calm Sunday and Szafi wrote her first post about the Radio Alphabet – a useful tool not just for aviation fans. Balint01 joined her on the 7th with his first post about “Fuller Planes – Good Or Bad?” – a brief explanation of revenue and capacity management of airlines.

A380 

A380 was one of our main topics this year. We could see the a video of an imaginery evacuation of an A380, we reported on that quite unusual initiation that Singapore Airlines sold the first tickets to the A380 on e-Bay and gave the money (USD 1,25 million) for charity. We tried to find out more about the possible cabin configurations and then we reported on the first delivery.

Boeing 787

Boeing 787, the Dreamliner was our other favorite topic. We wrote about it when it was revealed, we put it in our blog header, we reported on the first announcement of delay that predicted 2 months. Now it seems that a 6-month delay is more realistic.

Developments 

Besides A380 and B787 we saw the birth of a Russian jet called Sukhoi Superjet and a Chinese one called ARJ21-700. We kept track of technology trends in aviation. We wrote an article about RFID usage at airlines and airports, about e-ticketing, a new online payment method at Qantas, a weightless flight, a solar powered, unmanned aircraft. Also we were interested in service developments such as the new Virgin Atlantic Clubhouse at London Heathrow Airport, Lufthansa’s new A380 First Class Concept, Boeing’s 747 development to keep up with A380,

Crashes 

Unfortunately again some serious accidents happened. We saw around 200 people dying in a very tragical crash in Sao Paulo, brazil. 19 people died in an accident of Air Moorea on the way to Tahiti. When China Airline’ 737 burst into fire and blew up, everybody could escape in time thanks to the flight crew, who was criticized for being rude – we thought it was better being rude than being inactive. Later it turned out that a loose bolt caused the fire. There was a sad collision of two planes at an Air Show in Radom, Poland. SAS Airlineshad a bad series of crash landings – without serious injuries – of its Dash 8 turboprop planes. Finally they decided on grounding all their Dash 8 fleet. 87 died in One-Two-Go Airlines crash in Phuket, Thailand. A few days later rallye driver champion Colin McRae died in a helicopter crash over Scotland. The most commented article was the weird accident of an Airbus A340 on the ground of the Airbus factory during testing. The last serious accident of the year was an MD-83 crash in Turkey killing 56.

Photo reports 

We received a lot of photos from our friends and airline enthusiasts, so we could show a photo report of a Royal Aircraft in Budapest, Red Bull Air Race in Budapest, an Air Show in Kecskemet and the A340 Airbus crash at the Toulouse Airbus factory.

Innovations 

We criticized airlines and other players of the industry about wrong steps and we were happy to present good initiations of other players. We found KLM’s promotion: a gift of a costmetics set for online bookers a very smart and useful initiation. We loved Iberia’s enviroment-friendly attitude with naming their new aircrafts Royal Owl, Imperial Eagle and other endangered species. We could read funny comments about an interesting topic: Vatican’s Air Mistral. IATA’s initiation of a greener aviation industry was also worth a post.

Sex and rock and roll 

And finally we tried to entertain those not interested in professional matters of the airline business with articles like Sex in an airplane, Sexy stewardess uniforms – with special attention to the self-designed uniform of Easyjet, Superstar pilots, Special aircraft paintings and we learned about where lost luggage end up going.

We also lost a very key figure of the European airline indusry. Tony Ryan, the founder of Ryanair died on 03 October at the age of 71. Net year we will definately write an article about him, because only a few know about his role in today’s aviation business.

And what is our New Year’s resolution? Well, we’ll do our best to entertain you and draw your attention to the magic world of airlines we so much love.

We both wish you a very happy, successful new year and please keep on reading us! 🙂

By Szafi and balint01

Sexy Stewardess Uniforms

It has been a long time I wanted to take the time and write this post. It is a little bit long, but I ensure you it is not just the photos that are interesting! 🙂

Who can become a flight attendant?

Not everybody qualifies for a stewardes. Flighat attendants need to go through a 6 weeks to 6 months training period that includes psychological, IQ and physical tests (depending on the airline’s requirements). Safety training includes, but is not limited to: emergency passenger evacuation management, use of evacuation slides / life rafts, in-flight fire fighting, survival in the jungle, sea, desert, ice, first aid, Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), defibrillation, ditching/emergency landing procedures, decompression emergencies, Crew Resource Management and security.

But even those, who pass these tests and trainings, may fail. Some airlines have height and weight requirements. While airlines using bigger jets have minimum height limit, because air hostesses cannot reach the overhead compartments, regional carriers have maximum height limit as the ceiling of the aircrafts is very low. Weight is almost always a concern. Even if they do not communicate it, almost all airlines hire only girls with regular weight. Neither underweighing, nor overweighing applicants are accepted. Even later if somebody gains some weight do the airlines give out a new uniform to anyone.

Playmates, beauty queens

Sex has always been associated with flight attendants. There have been several playmates and former bueauty queen working as stewardesses. No wonder that if we take a look at the series of known women who worked as flight attendants before or after they became famous.

Some of them were:

  • Ester Codet was a playmate of the motnh in October 1974
  • Avis Miller was playmate in November, 1970
  • Julie Woodson was playmate in April, 1973
  • Jennifer Hosten was Miss World in 1970, first to win this title for her home, Grenada.
  • Kate Linder is still an active US actress
  • Evangeline Lilly is a Golden-globe nominated actress, most known for her role in Lost. She worked for Air Canada.

Ester CodetAvis MillerJennifer Hosten

Kate LinderEvangeline Lilly

History of airline uniforms

Old Delta Airlines uniformThe first stewardess uniforms were designed to be durable, practical, and inspire confidence in passengers. The first stewardesses for United Airlines wore green berets, green capes and nurse’s shoes. Other airlines, such as Eastern Air Lines, actually dressed stewardesses in nurses’ uniforms.
Perhaps reflecting the military aviation background of many commercial aviation pioneers, many early uniforms had a strongly military appearance; hats, jackets, and skirts showed simple straight lines and military details like epaulettes and brass buttons. Many uniforms had a summer and winter version, differentiated by colours and fabrics appropriate to the season: navy blue for winter, for example, khaki for summer. But as the role of women in the air grew, and airline companies began to realise the publicity value of their stewardesses, more feminine lines and colours began to appear in the late 1930s and early 1940s. Some airlines began to commission designs from high-end department stores and still others called in noted designers or even milliners to create distinctive and attractive apparel.

Famous fashion designers – famous uniforms

British Airways new uniform designChristian Lacroix designs uniforms for Air France. British Airways flight crews and staff now sport designs by Givenchy star Julien Macdonald. Los Angeles-based celebrity designer Richard Tyler presented Delta Air Lines’ new line-up alongside his ready-to-wear collection during New York Fashion Week. Korean Air launched new outfits by Italian designer Gianfranco Ferre, including pants for the first time in the airline’s history.

Sexiest airline uniforms

And now let’s look at the list of the most sexy airline uniforms:

1. Hooters Air

Hooter AirHooters Air

2. Singapore Airlines

Singapore Airlines

3. Malaysia Airlines

Malaysia AirlinesMalaysia Airlines

4. Delta Airlines

Delta Air LinesDelta Air Lines

5. Thai Airways

Thai Airways

6. Etihad Airways

Etihad Airways

7. Gulf Air

Gulf Air

8. Air France

Air FranceAir FranceAir France

9. Wizz Air

Wizz Air

10. Sky Europe

Sky EuropeSky Europe

If you liked this collection, check out our other post about special aircraft paintings and our other post about airline meals!

By Szafi

Our blog is moving to a new place. Please drop us an email to intairline@gmail.com, if you would like to receive updates about our blog!


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